Archive for the ‘Georgia ballparks’ Category

Savannah’s Historic Grayson Stadium and the Extermination of the Sand Gnats

July 29th, 2015

Grayson Stadium is located at 1401 East Victory Drive in Savannah, Georgia. Opened in 1926, the ballpark originally was known as Municipal Stadium.

Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Located in Daffin Park, Grayson Stadium is part of the Daffin Park-Parkside historic district and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

The ballpark is one of the most picturesque in the country. Sadly, it appears professional baseball will be departing Savannah at the end of the 2015 season.

Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

The Savannah Indians of the South Atlantic League played at Municipal Stadium beginning in 1926, through the 1928 season, and returned in 1936.

Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

On August 11, 1940, a  Category 2 hurricane struck Savannah, destroying a substantial portion of the ballpark. Only two sections of concrete bleachers were left standing.

Exteterior of Original Concrete Bleachers, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Exterior of Original Concrete Bleachers, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

One of those sections, which once sat beyond left field, was demolished during a renovation of the ballpark in 1995.

Blue Prints Detailing Original Municipal Stadium Layout (armstrongdigitalhistory.org)

Blue Prints Detailing Original Municipal Stadium Layout (armstrongdigitalhistory.org)

The other concrete bleachers section remaining from the original 1926 ballpark sits along the first base line.

Exterior of Original Concrte Bleachers, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Exterior of Original Concrete Bleachers, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

View from Grandstand of Original Concrete Bleachers, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

View from Grandstand of Original Concrete Bleachers, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Interior View of Original Concrete Bleachers, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Interior View of Original Concrete Bleachers, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

After the hurricane, Municipal Stadium was rebuilt in 1940-1941, under the leadership of Spanish-American War veteran General William L. Grayson, and with funds from the Work Progress Administration.

1941 Grandstand, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

1941 Grandstand, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Wood and Steel Grandstand Ceiling, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Wood and Steel Grandstand Ceiling, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

To see additional blueprints of the 1940 renovation, visit armstrongdigitalhistory.org – Grayson Stadium Project.

Grandstand, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

View from Grandstand, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

With the ballpark substantially complete in 1941, construction was a halted during World War II.

First Base Side Grandstand, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

First Base Side Grandstand, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

A portion of the third base grandstand remained uncompleted for seven decades, and was finished only recently.

Third Base Grandstand With Brick Work Completed Some 70 Seasons Later

Third Base Grandstand With Brick Work Completed Some 70 Seasons Later

In 1941, the City of Savannah renamed the ballpark in honor of General Grayson, who died that same year.

Plaque Honoring 1941 Renovation of Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Plaque Honoring William H. Grayson and 1941 Renovation of Grayson Stadium Grandstand, Savannah, Georgia

In 1943, the South Atlantic League suspended operations because of the war and the Indians departed Grayson Stadium. The Indians returned in 1946, playing at Grayson Stadium through the 1953 season.

Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Concession Stand Underneath First Base Grandstand, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

In 1954, Savannah’s South Atlantic League team became an affiliate of the Kansas City Athletics. The team switched its name to the Savannah A’s in 1954. Savannah’s South Atlantic League team switched affiliates several more times, beginning in 1956 with Cincinnati Reds (through 1959), Pittsburgh Pirates (1960, also from 1936 to 1938), and the Chicago White Sox (1962).

Grayson Stadium Grandstand, Circa 1941, Savannah, Georgia

Grayson Stadium Grandstand, Circa 1941, Savannah, Georgia

Savannah did not field a team in 1961, and from 1963 to 1967. In 1968 Savannah joined the Southern League as an affiliate of the Washington Senators. The team remained in the Southern League through 1983, with the exception of 1971, when Savannah played in the Dixie Association. In 1969 the Senators and the Houston Astros shared the Savannah affiliate, and, in 1970, Savannah became an affiliate of the Cleveland Indians. From 1971 to 1983, Savannah was an affiliate of the Atlanta Braves.

Ticket Booth, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Ticket Booth, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

In 1984, Savannah rejoined the South Atlantic League, as an affiliate of the St. Louis Cardinals, with whom they remained affiliated through the 1994 season. The team changed its name to the Sand Gnats in 1995, and was an affiliate of the Los Angeles Dodgers from 1995 to 1997, the Texas Rangers from 1998 to 2002, the Montreal Expos from 2003 to 2005, the Washington Nationals from 2005 to 2006, and the New York Mets from 2007 to 2015.

Tonight's South Alantic League Standings and Lineup, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Tonight’s South Alantic League Standings and Lineup, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

In addition to the Indians and the Sand Gnats, since 1926, Savannah’s minor league team has been known as the A’s, the Redlegs, the Reds, the Pirates, the White Sox, the Senators, the Braves, and the Cardinals.

Plaque Honoring John Henry Moss, President SAL, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Plaque Honoring John Henry Moss, President SAL, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

According to Armstrong State University History Department, no Negro League baseball ever was played at Municipal or Grayson Stadium.

Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

As for Babe Ruth, he appeared at least two times at Municipal Stadium: first, in 1927, during a spring exhibition game between the 1926 World Series champions St. Louis Cardinals and the American League champions New York Yankees, which the Cardinals won 20-10; and second in 1935, as a member of the Boston Braves when his team played an exhibition game against South Georgia Teacher’s College, which is now Georgia Southern University. The Braves won that contest 15 – 1, during which Ruth hit a third-inning home run over the fence in right field.

Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

A 1995 renovation to Grayson Stadium was renovated, brought the addition of a press box above the grandstand roof and the demolition of the left field bleachers.

Press Box Above Home Plate and Third Base, Home Team Dugout, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Press Box Above Home Plate and Third Base, Home Team Dugout, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

In 2007, another renovation added a new scoreboard in center field.

"New" Scoreboard, Installed 2007, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

“New” Scoreboard, Installed 2007, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Original Hand Operated  Scoreboard, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Original Hand Operated
Scoreboard, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

For the past several seasons, Savannah’s current minor league affiliate has encouraged the city to construct a new ballpark.

Concession Stand, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Concession Stand, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Concession Stand, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Concession Stand, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Apparently, the older the ballpark, the louder the drum beat is to replace it. Unfortunately, what fans find quaint about old ballparks, the teams actually playing there find challenging at best.

Years of Paint and Changing Colors, Reflected in Bench Seating at Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Years of Paint and Changing Colors, Reflected in Bench Seating at Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

In 2015, the Sand Gnats announced they would be departing Grayson Stadium at the end of the season and relocating to a new ballpark being constructed in Columbia, South Carolina.

Main Concourse, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Main Concourse, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

The departure of the Sand Gnats most likely spells the end of professional baseball at Grayson Stadium.

Entrance to Grandstand from Concourse, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Entrance to Grandstand from Concourse, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

The good news is it appears that a collegiate wooden bat team will be playing at Grayson Stadium beginning in 2016.

Bullpen, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Bullpen, Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

If you want to catch a professional game at Grayson Stadium, the Sand Gnat’s season runs through September 2, 2015.

Carolina Pines Left Field at Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

Carolina Pines Left Field at Grayson Stadium, Savannah, Georgia

The ballpark most definitely is worth a visit. If you are anywhere near Savannah, and are a fan of the game (which presumably you are or you would not be reading this) be sure to take in a game at Historic Grayson Stadium before professional baseball departs its friendly confines.

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Atlanta’s Other Lost Ballpark – Ponce De Leon Park

August 5th, 2013

Long before Turner Field, before Fulton County Stadium, there was a wonderful minor league  ballpark in Atlanta known as Ponce De Leon Park.

Ponce De Leon Park, Atlanta, Georgia

Ponce De Leon was the home to the Atlanta Crackers and Atlanta Black Crackers. The Atlanta Crackers played in the Southern Association from 1901 until 1965, and played at Ponce De Leon in an earlier incarnation of the stadium starting in 1907. Destroyed by fire in 1923, the stadium was rebuilt for the 1924 season.  The Atlanta Black Crackers played in the Negro Southern League and played at Ponce De Leon Park from 1920 to 1937, and 1940 until 1952.

Aerial View of Ponce De Leon Park

Located  at  the intersection of Ponce De Leon Avenue and Lakeview Avenue, less than four miles south of  the Braves current home, Turner Field, the former site of Ponce De Leon Park is a shopping center known as Midtown Place.

Midtown Place, Former Site of Ponce De Leon Park

The ballpark was demolished in 1966, the same year that the Atlanta Braves, having just relocated from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, began play at Fulton County Stadum.

Shopping Center Sign At The Former Site of Ponce De Leon Park

The stores at the site today, such as Home Depot and Whole Foods, intersect what was once third base and left field.

Whole Food and T. J. Max Built On Hallowed Ground

The most notable landmark at the former site of Ponce De Leon Park is the old Sears and Roebuck Warehouse at 675 Ponce De Leon Avenue.

Sears and Roebuck Warehouse Looming Beyond Ponce De Leon park (Image courtesy of Georgia State University Library (LBCB114-072b, Lane Brothers Commercial Photographers Photographic)) Collection)

The Sears warehouse remains at the site today.

Former Site of Center Field Looking Toward First Base, With Former Sears Warehouse In Background

Built in 1926, the former warehouse now houses offices of the city of Atlanta and is known informally as City Hall East.

Sears and Roebuck Warehouse

In addition to the former Sears warehouse, another notable landmark at the former Ponce De Leon site is a magnolia street that sits beyond what was once center field.

Magnolia Tree, a Landmark of Ponce De Leon Park

The magnolia tree remains from the days of Ponce De Leon Park. Two ballplayers are known to have hit home runs into the tree  during exhibition games, Hall of Famers Eddie Mathews and Babe Ruth.

Stone and Concrete Wall At Former Site of Ponce De Leon Park

Another landmark is a stone and concrete wall that ran along the parking lot, paralleling the third base side.

The Atlanta Crackers and the Atlanta Black Crackers may be long gone from Atlanta, but they are not forgotten. Located on the northwest side of Turner Field at Aisle 134 is the Ivan Allen Jr. Braves Museum& Hall of Fame which includes over 600 Braves artifacts and photographs, including some items relevant to Ponce De Leon Park.

Jersey of Former Atlanta Black Cracker James “Red” Moore.

Ponce De Leon Park was named after the avenue along which it sat.

Postcard “Ponce De Leon Base Ball Park, Atlanta, GA, ‘Watching The Game.'” (Published By I.F. Co., Inc., Atlanta, GA, C.T. American Art)

Of course, Ponce De Leon was a Spanish explorer associated with the legend of the fountain of youth. Ponce De Leon died in 1521. The ballpark that bears his name was demolished in 1966. Neither apparently were able to benefit from that legend. However, the several landmarks that remain at the site make a trip to the corner of Lakeview and Ponce De Leon well worth the journey.

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Shoeless Joe Jackson Comes To Savannah

September 21st, 2012

Shoeless Joe Jackson was born in South Carolina in 1887. He began his professional baseball career in 1908, playing first for the Greenville Spinners and then for the Philadelphia Athletics later that season. In 1909 Shoeless Joe started the year with the Savannah Indians, before once again being called up by the Athletics.

Shoeless Joe Jackson as a Member of the Savannah Indians in 1909

After being banned from baseball in 1921, Jackson and his family moved back to Savannah in 1922, where he established a dry cleaning business known as Savannah Valet Service. One of his company’s two shops was located at 119 Drayton Street.

Former Site of Savannah Valet Service - 119 Drayton Street, Savannah, GA

On a recent trip to Savannah I went looking for the building that once housed the Savannah Valet Service, only to discover that it had been torn down and in 2001 made into a parking lot for the Evangelical Lutheran Church of the Ascension.

Entrance to Parking Lot for the Evangelical Lutheran Church of the Ascension

The Church of the Ascension itself is located next door to the former site of Jackson’s dry cleaners business.

Former Site of Jackson's Dry Cleaners Business With Church of the Ascension Visible in Background

Luckily, there is better news regarding two places where Jackson lived while in Savannah. The apartment building where he first lived after moving to Savannah after leaving baseball remains at 143 Abercorn Street .

Apartment Building Where Shoeless Joe Jackson Lived In Savannah, GA

A stucco, three story, center hall walk up, the building was constructed in 1914.

Front Entrance To 143 Abercorn Street, Savannah, GA

Renovation of the building in the mid 2000’s won an Historic Preservation Award by the Historic Savannah Foundation.

Historic Preservation Award For 143 Abercorn Street, Savannah, GA

Jackson later moved to a single family home at 1411 East 39th Street, which is located just four blocks north of Historic Grayson Stadium, current home of the Savannah Sand Gnats.

Shoeless Joe Jackson's Former Home At 1411 East 39th Street, Savannah, GA

Jackson’s former home is a two bedroom, one story bungalow. In front of the house next door to Jackson’s former home is a oak tree draped with Spanish moss, undoubtedly dating back to Jackson’s time living there.

Tree From The Time Of Jackson, 1411 East 39th Street

Should you find yourself in Savannah, Georgia, take a moment to see places where Shoeless Joe Jackson lived. Those buildings are a link to the past and help give fans a little better appreciate of Joe Jackson’s life after he was banned from baseball.

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Ballpark Found – Fort Pulaski And The First Known Photo Of Baseball

August 13th, 2012

This post concerns not a lost ballpark, but a ballpark found. Well, not actually a ballpark, but a place where the game was once played. Captured for posterity in a photograph from 1862 is a baseball game in progress in the courtyard of Fort Pulaski National Monument, Georgia. The players can be seen playing behind an Army formation of the 48th New York Volunteers during the Civil War.

Ballplaying At Fort Polaski, Civil War Style (National Park Service Photograph)

Fort Pulaski is named after Revolutionary War hero Casimir Pulaski. If you’re a civil war buff and a fan of the game, a stop at the National Monument is well worth the trip. Standing on top of the Fort, which is accessible from a variety of staircases located around the interior of the Fort, provides an incredible view of the courtyard and the location where the image of  baseball was captured 150 years ago.

Fort Pulaski Georgia, Site Of The First Known Photograph Of Baseball

It should be noted that the Fort itself is constructed in the shape of a home plate, and the game in the photograph was located in what would be the tip of home plate.

"FortPulaski02" by Edibobb - Own work. Licensed under CC BY 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:FortPulaski02.jpg#/media/File:FortPulaski02.jpg

Fort Pulaski Aerial Photo Courtesy of “FortPulaski02” by Edibobb – Own work. Licensed under CC BY 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:FortPulaski02.jpg#/media/File:FortPulaski02.jpg

And, not to stretch the baseball analogy too thin, but there exists in Virginia a baseball stadium in the town named in honor of Revolutionary War hero Casimir Pulaski. The Appalachian League ballpark, originally known as Pulaski Field and currently named Calfee Park, was built in 1935.

Entrance To Pulaski Field in Pulaski, Virginia

According to the Pulaski Mariners, the ballpark’s current occupant, the ballpark is  the 9th oldest minor league stadium in the country.

Pulaski Field, Pulaski, West Virginia

A quick review of my baseball encyclopedia reveals no ballplayer named Pulaski. There has been, however, at least one Casimir who played major league ball – Casimir James “Jim” Konstanty – who played for the Philadelphia Phillies, among other teams, and was the National League MVP for 1950. No word yet whether Mr. Konstanty ever visited Fort Pulaski or played any games at Pulaski Field.

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Fulton County Stadium Redux

April 5th, 2012

The Georgia Historical Society and Georgia Public Broadcasting honor the memory of Fulton County Stadium on April 15th as part of their joint collaboration Today in Georgia History. The one minute video includes some pictures from my 2010 blog about Fulton County Stadium on Deadballbaseball.com Fulton County Stadium Makes A Great Parking Lot. Atlanta broke ground on Fulton County Stadium on April 15, 1964. The Braves arrived two years later.

Click here: Today in Georgia History to watch the video.

Click here: Credits and Bibliography for additional information about Fulton County Stadium from the Georgia Historical Society.

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Welcome to Royston, Home of Baseball’s Immortal Ty Cobb

November 9th, 2011

Born in 1886 in Narrows, Georgia, Tyrus Raymond “Ty” Cobb moved with his family at an early age to Royston, Georgia.

Sign On Highway 8 Welcoming Visitors to Royston, Home of Ty Cobb

The sign located east of the town on Highway 8 is a vinyl reproduction of a painted plywood sign erected by the Royston Chamber of Commerce when Cobb was still alive.

Original Royston Welcome Sign with Ty Cobb Posing Below (copy of photograph on display at Ty Cobb Museum)

At one point there were four of these signs posted on the two major highways that run through Royston, Highways 8 and 17.  The only other sign currently standing is the one located north of the town on Highway 17.

Royston Welcome Sign Located North of Town On Highway 17

The original Welcome to Royston civic  sign sits opposite the Ty Cobb sign  on Highway 17 north of town.

Welcome To Royston Civic Sign

The town of Royston has many monuments and tributes to Cobb.  After retiring from baseball, Cobb donated a significant amount of money in his parent’s name to build a hospital in Royston for the people of Franklin County, Georgia.

Ty Cobb Healthcare System and Museum

Several buildings in Royston now honor Cobb and his philanthropic endeavors on behalf of the people of Franklin County. The Ty Cobb Healthcare System building is located on Highway 8 as you enter town from the west.

Ty Cobb Health Center

The Ty Cobb Museum alone is worth a stop in Royston.  Once located in the Royston Civic Center, the museum now resides in the Joe A. Adams Professional Building on Cook Street, across the street from the building housing the Ty Cobb Healthcare System.

Ty Cobb Museum Located In The Joe A. Adams Professional Building

The museum includes several displays honoring the baseball life  of Ty Cobb.

Display in Ty Cobb Museum

Of note in the museum is a Cobb’s 1907 American League Batting Champion Metal and a pair of his cleats.

Display at the Ty Cobb Museum

The Cobb Theater includes a short movie on the baseball life of Ty Cobb.

Ty Cobb Museum Movie Theater

Unfortunately, there is little  in the town of Royston that actually gives visitors a feel for Cobb as a private citizen living in Royston.  The boyhood home where he lived (and where his mother shot his father to death – allegedly having mistaken him for an intruder) no longer stands.  Its location is now, ironically, the parking lot for a funeral home.  The Pruitt Funeral Home is located at 47 Franklin Springs Street.

Pruitt Funeral Home Royston Georgia

The parking lot where Cobb’s house once stood is between the funeral home and the Royston First United Methodist Church, 137 Franklin Springs Street.

Pruitt Funeral Home Parking Lot - Former Site of Ty Cobb Boyhood Home

Some of the buildings located at the center of town date to the time of Cobb’s boyhood in Royston.  One of the most significant is the Joe T. Cunningham Furniture Store on Church Street, near the corner of Church and Franklin Springs Street.

Cunningham Furniture Store

Cobb and Joe Cunningham were close friends.  Cunningham, a cabinet and casket maker, used to make baseball bats for Cobb.  Inside the furniture store building, which currently houses Joe T. Cunningham Interiors, run by his granddaughter, is a display featuring pictures  of Cobb and his life  in Royston.

Cunningham Display Paying Tribute To Ty Cobb

Other buildings relevant to Cobb’s life in Royston include the former post office building at 963 Church Street.

Old Post Office

Across the street from the old post office at 964 Church Street is Jacksons On Main – Antiques and Collectibles – which sells a limited amount of Cobb baseball memorabilia.

Store That Sells Ty Cobb Memorabilia

One door down from Joe T. Cunningham’s Furniture Store, at the corner of Church Street and Franklin Springs Street, is a mural celebrating Cobb’s baseball career.

Ty Cobb Mural Downtown Royston

A Georgia State historical marker located in front of the Royston City Hall at 634 Franklin Springs Street honors Cobb, “the Georgia Peach.”

Georgia State Historical Marker Ty Cobb "The Georgia Peach"

City Hall, also known as the Ty Cobb Memorial Civic Center, includes a plaza with a granite monument erected in memory of Cobb.

i

Ty Cobb Memorial Civic Center

 

Ty Cobb Memorial Civic Center Plaza

Cobb’s granite monument stands approximately eight feet tall.

Royston's Ty Cobb Monument

The front of the monument includes a likeness of  Cobb wearing his Detroit Tigers uniform, bat in hand.

Detail of Ty Cobb Monument

The back side of the monument lists some of his many baseball accomplishments.

Back of Ty Cobb Monument

Other Royston tributes to Cobb include the town crest that adorns Royston’s municipal vehicles.

Royston City Truck Adorned With Image Of Ty Cobb

The housing development located behind city hall is named “Cobb Walk” in honor of the town’s favorite son.

Cobb Walk Housing Development In Royston Georgia

Cobb is buried on the outskirts of Royston in Rose Hill Cemetery, located on Old Elbert Road, a quarter mile off Highway 17 (Church Street).

Pavilion Next To Ty Cobb Burial Site

Cobb helped choose the mausoleum design which now holds his remains.

Ty Cobb Burial Site, Rose Hill Cemetery

Royston, Georgia, does not qualify as a lost ballpark.  However it is worth a mention and a visit, given its connection to one of the greatest baseball players. Although the town includes many tributes to the great Ty Cobb, the town itself offers little in the way of attractions that help visitors appreciate the town as he knew it.  Cobb played baseball in and around Royston for many years before leaving to play professional ball.  Perhaps baseball fans in Royston could somehow determine where those fields were located.  A plaque noting their location would allow visitors to stand on the same spot where young Ty Cobb honed his baseball skills, which would go a long way toward connecting the town of Royston to its favorite, famous son.

 

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Fulton County Stadium Makes A Great Parking Lot – For Now

April 23rd, 2010

Atlanta/Fulton County Stadium was the fourth home of the National League Braves and the first in Atlanta. The Braves two previous homes were Braves Field in Boston and County Stadium in Milwaukee.

Atlanta/Fulton County Stadium, Once Home of the Braves (Dexter Press, Inc.)

Once nestled at the confluence of Interstates 75, 85, and 20, Fulton County Stadium is now a parking lot.

The Friendly Confines of Atlanta/Fulton County Stadium and Interstate 75 (Scenic South Card Co.)

Unlike other lost ballparks, however, Fulton County Stadium is not quite gone or forgotten.  Portions of the old ballpark remain in the parking lot adjacent to the Braves’ current home, Turner Field.

Baseball Paradise Now A Parking Lot

The stadium’s outer retaining wall, now painted blue, marks the outline of Fulton County Stadium.

Fulton County Stadium Outer Wall

The blue outer wall marks the area from the right field corner around to the first base side of home plate.

The Right Field Corner

The infield, foul lines, and warning track are marked with brown pavers.

No Place Like Home

And if all that weren’t enough, the que de gras of the former Fulton County Stadium site is the portion of the metal, outfield fence marking where Hank Aaron’s record breaking home run number 715 cleared Dodger’s outfielder Bill Buckner and landed in the mit of Braves relief pitcher Tom House, who was standing in the Braves’ bullpen.

"There's new home run champion of all time and it's Henry Aaron" (Braves Announcer Milo Hamilton)

Hank Aaron at Fulton County Stadium (1972 Atlanta Braves Fan Photo)

In 1997, the Braves moved across Hank Aaron Street to Turner Field.

Turner Field, Home of the Atlanta Braves

The original plaque honoring Fulton County Stadium – Atlanta Stadium – is located in the plaza outside the main gate of Turner Field just south of Georgia Avenue.

Original "Atlanta Stadium" Plaque Now Located Outside Turner Field

Located on the northwest side of Turner Field at Aisle 134 is the Ivan Allen Jr. Braves Museum & Hall of Fame which includes over 600 Braves artifacts and photographs, including several items from Fulton County Stadium.

Turnstile from Fulton County Stadium

The Braves museums offers fans the chance to sit in Fulton County Stadium seats and relive Hank Aaron’s famous home run breaking Babe Ruth’s record of 714.

Stadium Seats from Fulton County Stadium

The Atlanta dugout is recreated as well, including the bat and helmet racks.

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Recreated Dugout of Fulton County Stadium

Fans are free to have a seat on the dugout bench or lean on the railing.

Dugout from Fulton County Stadium

Former player lockers from Fulton County Stadium are used throughout the museum to display Atlanta Braves memorabilia.

Fulton County Stadium Player Lockers

The piece de resistance of the Braves museum is the actual ball that Hank Aaron hit over Fulton County Stadium’s left field wall to break Babe Ruth’s home run record of 714. Also on display is the bat Hammerin Hank used that day.

One of the Greatest Baseball Artifacts Ever - Hank Aaron's Home Run Ball No. 715

Any fan of the game visiting Atlanta or Turner Field should make a stop at the parking lot across the street.  Thanks to the forward thinking of Atlanta officials, it is still possible visit Fulton County Stadium and experience its most famous moment. Once inside Turner Field, the Braves Museum and Hall of Fame is definitely worth the one token it costs to enter (approximately $2).

With the Braves announcement in November 2013 that the team will be leaving Turner Field at the end of the 2016 season for a new ballpark to be built in Cobb, a suburb ten miles north of Atlanta, the future of the Fulton County Stadium parking lot and stadium markers is now in doubt. Demolition of Turner Field is scheduled for 2017. Only time will tell what, if anything, will remain of Fulton County Stadium or Turner Field.

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