Posts Tagged ‘Detroit Tigers affiliate’

Bears And Mile High Stadium in Denver CO

August 18th, 2015

Bears Stadium was located at 2755 West 17th Avenue, in Denver, Colorado. Constructed in 1947, the ballpark was the home of the Western Association Denver Bears beginning in 1948. From 1949 to 1951, the Bears were an affiliate of the Boston Braves, and from 1952 to 1954, they were an affiliate of the Pittsburgh Pirates. In 1955, the Bears joined the American Association, where the team remained through the 1992 season, with the exception of 1963 to 1968 when the team played in the Pacific League.

Bears Stadium, Denver, Colorado (Postcard Dexter Press Inc., Published by Sanborn Souvenir Co.)

Bears Stadium, Denver, Colorado (Postcard Dexter Press Inc., Published by Sanborn Souvenir Co.)

The team’s major league affiliation changed every few years, beginning with the New York Yankees from 1956 to 1958, the Detroit Tigers from 1960 to 1962, the Milwaukee Braves from 1963 to 1964, the Minnesota Twins from 1965 to 1969, the Washington Senators from 1970 to 1971, the Texas Rangers in 1972 and 1982, the Houston Astros from 1973 to 1974, the Chicago White Sox in 1975 and from 1983 to 1984, the Montreal Expos from 1976 to 1981, the Cincinnati Reds from 1986 to 1987, and the Milwaukee Brewers from 1988 to 1992. In 1984, the team changed its name to the Denver Zephyrs in honor of a passenger train of the same name that ran between Chicago, Illinois, and Denver, Colorado, beginning in the 1930s. In 1993, with the arrival of the Major League Colorado Rockies, the Zephyrs moved to New Orleans, Louisiana.

Aerial Photo of Mile High Stadium With Denver, Colorado in Background (Postcard Sanborn Souvenir Co., Made by Kina Italia, Photo by William P. Sanborn)

Aerial Photo of Mile High Stadium With Denver, Colorado in Background (Postcard Sanborn Souvenir Co., Made by Kina Italia, Photo by William P. Sanborn)

Beginning in 1960 the ballpark was expanded with additional bleacher seating to house fans of the American Football League Denver Broncos.

Mile High Stadium Configured for Baseball (Postcard Plastichrome, Distributed by G.R. Dickson)

Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado,  Configured for Baseball (Postcard Plastichrome, Distributed by G.R. Dickson)

In 1968, the City of Denver purchased the ballpark, added portions of an upper deck, and renamed the venue Mile High Stadium. In 1970, the Broncos joined the National Football League. Additional seats were added during the 1970s, including a section in left field that could be moved to accommodate either baseball or football.

Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado (Postcard by Plastichrome, Distributed by G.R. Dickson Co.)

Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado (Postcard by Plastichrome, Distributed by G.R. Dickson Co.)

In 1993, the MLB expansion Colorado Rockies began play at Mile High Stadium. That season the Rockies set the all-time MLB home attendance record of 4,483,350.

Coors Field, Denver, Colorado, Circa 1998

Coors Field, Denver, Colorado, Circa 1998

In 1996, the Rockies moved two miles northeast of Mile High Stadium to the newly constructed Coors Field, leaving the Broncos as the sole permanent tenant of Mile High Stadium.

Coors Field, Denver, Colorado, Circa 1998

Coors Field, Denver, Colorado, Circa 1998

The Broncos played at Mile High Stadium through the 2000 season. In 2001 the team moved to newly constructed Invesco Field at Mile High, which was built adjacent to Mile High Stadium, directly to the south.

Sports Authority Stadium at Mile High, Located South of Former Site of Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado

Sports Authority Stadium at Mile High, Located South of Former Site of Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado

In 2012, the football stadium was renamed Sports Authority Field at Mile High.

Former Site, Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado

Colorado Sports Hall of Fame at Sports Authority Field, Former Site, Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado

A plaque located in the north parking lot of Sports Authority Field commemorates the history of Bears Stadium and Mile High Stadium.

Plaque Honoring Former Site of Bears Stadium and Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado

Plaque Honoring Former Site of Bears Stadium and Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado

Former Site of Bears Stadium and Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado

Former Site of Bears Stadium and Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado

Placed there by the Society for American Baseball Research and the Colorado Rockies, the plaque reads:

“As you look to the north from this spot you are viewing the land upon which stood Bears Stadium. From 1948 to 1994, it was the home of professional baseball in Denver. The Denver Bears (later renamed the Zephyrs in 1985) played at Bears Stadium (later renamed Mile High Stadium) through 1992. When Major League Baseball arrived in Denver in 1993, Mile High Stadium housed the Colorado Rockies for two seasons until Coors Field was completed in 1995. The precise location of home plate is indicated by a commemorative landmark approximately 500 ft. to the north of this plaque.”

Former Site of Bears Stadium and Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado

Former Site of Home Plate, Bears Stadium and Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado

A grass berm sits along the north and west side of the parking lot. That area is where the first and third base grandstand of Bears Stadium once stood.

Former Site of Center Field, Looking Towards Home Plate, Bears Stadium and Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado

Former Site of Center Field, Looking Towards Home Plate, Bears Stadium and Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado

One additional landmark at the site is the former Hotel VQ, which is located at 1975 Mile High Stadium Circle just beyond the former site of left field. Built in 1982, the building is being converted to micro apartments.

Hotel VQ, Located Beyond Former Site of Left Field, Bears Stadium and Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado

Hotel VQ, Located Beyond Former Site of Left Field, Bears Stadium and Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado

For almost half a century, baseball was played in what is now the north parking lot of Stadium Authority Field. Thanks to SABR and the Colorado Rockies, the site is well marked and certainly worth a visit. Many thanks to Jason Papka for providing the recent pictures of the site.

Former Site of Bears Stadium and Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado

Former Site of Bears Stadium and Mile High Stadium, Located Just South of Downtown Denver, Colorado

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Mud Hens Former Roost – Ned Skeldon Stadium/Lucas County Stadium

May 10th, 2015

Ned Skeldon Stadium is located at 2901 Key Street in Maumee, Ohio. The ballpark was the home of the International League Toledo Mud Hens from 1965 to 2001.

Ned Skeldon Stadium, Toledo, Ohio

Ned Skeldon Stadium, Toledo, Ohio

The ballpark is located in the Lucas County Recreation Center and originally was part of the Lucas County Fairgrounds.

Ned Skeldon Stadium, Toledo, Ohio

Ned Skeldon Stadium, Toledo, Ohio

In 1955, when the Toledo Mud Hens departed Swayne Field and moved to Wichita, Kansas, Toledo was left without a minor league team. Ned Skeldon, who served as Toledo Vice Mayor and four terms as a Lucas County Commissioner, led the drive to bring minor league baseball back to area and to convert a former racetrack (Fort Miami Park) and football field on the Lucas County Fair Grounds into a minor league facility. The racetrack turned ballpark opened in 1965 as Lucas County Stadium.

Ned Skeldon Stadium, Toledo, Ohio

Ned Skeldon Stadium, Toledo, Ohio

The former International League Richmond Virginians moved to Maumee in 1965, thanks in large part to the efforts of Skeldon, and in 1988 Lucas County Stadium was renamed in his honor, just three months prior to his death.

Ned Skeldon Stadium, Toledo, Ohio

Ned Skeldon Stadium, Toledo, Ohio

Several Major League franchises were affiliated with the Mud Hens during the team’s years in Maumee. Primarily, the Mud Hens were an affiliate of the Detroit Tigers, for 22 seasons from 1967 to 1973 and from 1987 to 2001. Other Major League teams affiliated with the Mud Hens during the team’s years at Skeldon Field include the New York Yankees from 1965 to 1966, the Philadelphia Phillies from 1974 to 1975 (with future Hall of Famer Jim Bunning as manager), the Cleveland Indians from 1976 to 1977, and the Minnesota Twins from 1978 to 1986.

Ned Skeldon Stadium, Toledo, Ohio

Ned Skeldon Stadium, Toledo, Ohio

Ned Skeldon Stadium’s grandstand is uniquely configured because of its past as a racetrack for harness racing.

Front Entrance to Former Fort Miami Park, Ned Skeldon Stadium, Toledo, Ohio

Front Entrance to Former Fort Miami Park, Ned Skeldon Stadium, Toledo, Ohio

Fort Miami Park opened in 1917. It’s grandstand is located along the third base foul line and dates back to at least the 1920’s. In the late 1920’s, Fort Miami Park became the first harness racetrack in the country to feature night racing under electric lights.

Ned Skeldon Stadium, Toledo, Ohio

Ned Skeldon Stadium, Toledo, Ohio

When the ballpark was enclosed for baseball in the mid 1960’s Lucas County added a grandstand behind home plate that wrapped around to the first base.

Ned Skeldon Stadium, Toledo, Ohio

Ned Skeldon Stadium, Toledo, Ohio

The break in the grandstand between home plate and third base is somewhat reminiscent of the third base grandstand at Washington’s Griffith Stadium.

Former Fort Miami Park Grandstand at Ned Skeldon Stadium, Maumee, Ohio

Former Fort Miami Park Grandstand at Ned Skeldon Stadium, Maumee, Ohio

Concourse Underneath Former Fort Miami Park Grandstand, Now Ned Skeldon Stadium, Toledo, Ohio

Concourse Underneath Former Fort Miami Park Grandstand, Now Ned Skeldon Stadium, Toledo, Ohio

In 2002, the Mud Hens moved eight miles northeast to brand new Fifth Third Field, located at 406 Washington Street in Toledo, Ohio.  In case you were wondering, the name Fifth Third Field is a reference to Fifth Third Bank and the early 1900’s merger of two Cincinnati Banks, Third National Bank and Fifth National Bank.

Fifth Third Field,Toledo, Ohio

Fifth Third Field,Toledo, Ohio

After the Mud Hens departed Ned Skeldon Stadium, the ballpark, as part of the Lucas County Recreation Center complex, has continued to host amateur baseball, as well special events such as Fourth of July Fireworks. Private companies such as Line Drive Sportz have leased the facility and helped provide funds for its upkeep.

Ned Skeldon Stadium, Toledo, Ohio

Ned Skeldon Stadium, Toledo, Ohio

Ned Skeldon Stadium hosted Minor league baseball for 37 seasons. Prior to that, as Fort Miami Park, facility hosted harness racing for 40 years. The good news is Ned Skeldon Stadium does not appear to be in danger any time soon of becoming another lost ballpark.

Ned Skeldon Stadium, Toledo, Ohio

Ned Skeldon Stadium, Toledo, Ohio

If you are a baseball fan in Toledo, be sure to visit not only Ned Skeldon Stadium but also the site of Swayne Field, where the Mud Hens played from 1909 to 1955. The site is now the Swayne Field Shopping Center. Behind the shopping center is one of the oldest ballpark relics still standing in its original spot – a concrete wall that was once the left field wall at Swayne Field. The wall was built in 1909, the year Swayne Field opened, and is located just 10 miles northeast of Ned Skeldon Stadium at the intersection of Detroit Street and Council Street. Swayne Field also is located just two miles northwest of Fifth Third Field.

Original Outfield Wall, Looking Toward Left Field Corner From Detroit Street, Former Site of Swayne Field, Toledo, Ohio

Swayne Field’s Original Outfield Wall, Looking Toward Left Field Corner From Detroit Street, Toledo, Ohio

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Pullman Park – From Railroad Cars to Kelly Automotive Park

May 5th, 2015

Pullman Park was located at 100 Pullman Park Place near the intersection of Pillow Street and Plum Street in Butler, Pennsylvania.

Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania, Circa 2006

Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania, Circa 2006

The ballpark (first base side) was located alongside the former Standard Steel Car Company plant which manufactured railroad rolling stock (railroad cars) beginning in 1902.  Standard Steel was acquired by Pullman Car and Manufacturing Company in 1929 and merged in 1934 to become the Pullman-Standard Car Manufacturing Company.

Building that Once Housed Pullman Standard Manufacturing Company, Butler, Pennsylvania

Cut Stone Office Building that Once Housed Pullman Standard Manufacturing Company, Butler, Pennsylvania

In 1934 Pullman-Standard provided the land and and constructed Pullman Park. The company then donated the ballpark to the City of Butler.

Ticket Window, Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania, Circa 2006

Ticket Window, Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania, Circa 2006

In 1935, Pullman Park was the home of the Class-D Pennsylvania State Association (PSA) Butler Indians, an affiliate of the Cleveland Indians.

Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania, Circa 2006

Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania, Circa 2006

In 1936 the PSA Butler Yankees arrived in Butler and played their home games at Pullman Park. The Butler Yankees played through the 1942 season in Butler. During World War II, Butler did not field a team. The Butler Yankees returned to Pullman Park in 1946, playing in the Middle Atlantic League. The 1947 season was notable because it saw the professional debut of future Hall of Famer Whitey Ford who pitched for Butler that season. The Butler Yankees departed after the 1948 season.

Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania

Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania

From 1949 to 1951, the Butler Tigers played their home games at Pullman Park. In 1949 and 1950, the Butler Tigers were an affiliate of the Detroit Tigers. In 1951 they were an affiliate of the Pittsburgh Pirates.

First Base Seating, Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania, Circa 2006

First Base Grandstand Bleacher Seating, Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania, Circa 2006

Negro League exhibition games also were played at Pullman Park. At least one such game was played on July 8, 1937, when the Negro National League Homestead Grays played the NNL Pittsburgh Crawfords at Pullman Park.

Homestead Grays Poster (On Display at Kelly Automotive Park), Butler, Pennsylvania

Homestead Grays Poster (On Display at Kelly Automotive Park), Butler, Pennsylvania

Professional baseball departed Pullman Park after the 1951 season, and the ballpark thereafter was used primarily for high school baseball.

Light Stanchion, Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania, Circa 2006

Light Stanchion, Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania, Circa 2006

In 2005, the city closed Pullman Park. The ballpark was demolished in 2007 to make way for an entirely new baseball facility at the site. Below is a video of Pullman Park filmed in 2006, after the city had stopped utilizing Pullman Park for high school baseball, but before demolition had begun on the ballpark.

In 2007, the City of Butler began construction of new Pullman Park, designed to host both high school and college games. The ballpark includes a turf infield and natural grass outfield. In 2014, the name of the ballpark was changed to Kelly Automotive Park. The transformation of the ballpark from old Pullman Park to Kelly Automotive was remarkable. Although it is unfortunate that none of the original ballpark could be saved and preserved, by 2007 apparently there wasn’t much that could be reused, other than the field itself.

Kelly Automotive Park, Formerly Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania

Kelly Automotive Park, Formerly Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania

Grandstand, Kelly Automotive Ballpark, Butler, Pennsylvania

Grandstand, Kelly Automotive Ballpark, Butler, Pennsylvania

To get a sense of the transformation from Pullman Park to Kelly Automotive Park, below are before and after pictures of the ballpark taken from approximately the same angle and location. In 2006 I was unable to gain access to the park, so all the pictures of the old park are from outside looking in.

The front entrance from the third base side:

Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania, Circa 2006

Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania, Circa 2006

Kelly Automotive Park, Formerly Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania

Kelly Automotive Park, Formerly Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania

The exterior of the third base grandstand:

Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania, Circa 2006

Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania, Circa 2006

Kelly Automotive Park, Formerly Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania

Kelly Automotive Park, Formerly Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania

The front entrance from the first base side:

Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania, Circa 2006

Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania, Circa 2006

Kelly Automotive Park, Formerly Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania

Kelly Automotive Park, Formerly Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania

Exterior of the ballpark looking south:

Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania, Circa 2006

Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania, Circa 2006

Kelly Automotive Park, Formerly Pullman Park, Butler,  Pennsylvania

Kelly Automotive Park, Formerly Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania

The first base grandstand:

First Base Grandstand, Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania, Circa 2006

First Base Grandstand, Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania, Circa 2006

First Base Grandstand, Kelly Automotive Park, Butler, Pennsylvania

First Base Grandstand, Kelly Automotive Park, Butler, Pennsylvania

Interior of the first base grandstand:

Pullman Park Grandstand, Butler, Pennsylvania

Pullman Park Grandstand, Butler, Pennsylvania

Kelly Automotive Ballpark, Butler, Pennsylvania

Kelly Automotive Ballpark, Butler, Pennsylvania

View of right field with former American Bantam Car Company visible beyond the right field fence (in 1940, the American Bantam Car Company developed a Reconnaissance Car for the Army which was the prototype of the Jeep):

Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania, Circa 2006

Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania, Circa 2006

Industry Beyond Outfield Wall, Kelly Automotive Ballpark, Butler, Pennsylvania

Industrial Buildings Beyond Right Field Wall, Kelly Automotive Ballpark, Butler, Pennsylvania

View of center field:

Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania, Circa 2006

Looking Through Grandstand Toward Center Field, Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania, Circa 2006

Kelly Automotive Ballpark, Butler, Pennsylvania

Kelly Automotive Ballpark, Butler, Pennsylvania

View of left field:

Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania, Circa 2006

Pullman Park, Butler, Pennsylvania, Circa 2006

Kelly Automotive Ballpark, Butler, Pennsylvania

Kelly Automotive Ballpark, Butler, Pennsylvania

Kelly Automotive Park includes several displays on the concourse behind home plate that celebrate the history of Pullman Park.

Pullman Park History Display at Kelly Automotive Ballpark, Butler, Pennsylvania

Pullman Park History Display at Kelly Automotive Ballpark, Butler, Pennsylvania

Pullman Park History Display at Kelly Automotive Ballpark, Butler, Pennsylvania

Pullman Park History Display at Kelly Automotive Ballpark, Butler, Pennsylvania

Pullman Park History Display at Kelly Automotive Ballpark, Butler, Pennsylvania

Pullman Park History Display at Kelly Automotive Ballpark, Butler, Pennsylvania

Pullman Park History Display at Kelly Automotive Ballpark, Butler, Pennsylvania

Pullman Park History Display at Kelly Automotive Ballpark, Butler, Pennsylvania

The ballpark is surrounded by the buildings and industry that date to the time of Pullman Park.

My Buddy's Bar, With Pullman Park Mural, Across Street From Kelly Automotive Park, Butler, Pennsylvania

My Buddy’s Bar, With Pullman Park Mural, Across Street From Kelly Automotive Park, Butler, Pennsylvania

View of Houses Fronting Kelly Automotive Ballpark, Butler, Pennsylvania

View of Houses Fronting Kelly Automotive Ballpark, Butler, Pennsylvania

Concrete Plant, Kelly Automotive Ballpark, Butler, Pennsylvania

DuBrook Concrete Plant, Kelly Automotive Ballpark, Butler, Pennsylvania

Although the original ballpark is long gone, Kelly Automotive Park is a wonderful place to watch a high school or college game.

PSAC Baseball Tournament Banner at Kelly Automotive Park, Butler, Pennsylvania

PSAC Baseball Tournament Banner at Kelly Automotive Park, Butler, Pennsylvania

During summer months, Kelly Automotive Park is the home of the Butler Blue Sox of the collegiate wooden-bat rospect League.

Prospect League Standings Board at Kelly Automotive Park, Butler, Pennsylvania

Prospect League Standings Board at Kelly Automotive Park, Butler, Pennsylvania

And if you do see a game at Kelly Automotive Park, be sure to notice the outfield advertisement for Jones Turkey Farm posted on the right field fence. It certainly gives new meaning to the term “fowl ball.”

Turkey Farm Wall Sign - The First Such Ad I Have Ever Seen in a Ballpark, Kelly Automotive Ballpark, Butler, Pennsylvania

Fowl Ball! East Stroudsburg University Right Fielder Christian Rishel Playing Under the Watchful Eye of a Jones Turkey Farm Turkey, Kelly Automotive Ballpark, Butler, Pennsylvania

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Jamestown’s Gem – Russell E. Diethrick, Jr. Park

April 19th, 2015

Russell E. Diethrick, Jr. Park is located at 485 Falconer Street in Jamestown, New York.

Jamestown Municipal Stadium/Russell E. Diethrick, Jr. Park, Jamestown, New York

Jamestown Municipal Stadium/Russell E. Diethrick, Jr. Park, Jamestown, New York

Constructed in 1940 through a public/private partnership, the ballpark is owned and maintained by the City of Jamestown.

Jamestown Municipal Stadium Postcard (Curteich-Chicago Art Colortone, Weakley-Olson, Jamestown NY)

Jamestown Municipal Stadium Postcard (Curteich-Chicago Art Colortone, Weakley-Olson, Jamestown NY)

When it opened in 1941, the ballpark was known as Jamestown Municipal Stadium and was the home of the Pennsylvania-Ontario-New York League (PONY) Jamestown Falcons.

Plaque Honoring 1941 Dedication as  Jamestown Municipal Stadium, Jamestown, New York

Plaque Honoring 1941 Dedication as Jamestown Municipal Stadium, Jamestown, New York

In the early 1960s, Jamestown Community College built a new campus adjacent to Jamestown Municipal Stadium (just beyond left field) and the college baseball team began playing their home games at the ballpark. In the mid 1960s the ballpark was known locally as College Stadium and, in 1984, was renovated as College Stadium. Jamestown Community College’s baseball and softball teams still play their home games there.

Plaque Honoring 1984 Stadium Rededication as College Stadium, Jamestown, New York

Plaque Honoring 1984 Stadium Renovation of College Stadium, Jamestown, New York

In 1997, the name was changed to Russell E. Diethrick, Jr. Park in honor of a local Jamestown resident who had dedicate his life to both professional and amateur baseball in Jamestown.

Russell E. Dietrick, Jr. Park, Jamestown, New York, Former Home of the Jamestown Jammers

Russell E. Diethrick, Jr. Park, Jamestown, New York, Former Home of the Jamestown Jammers

Plaque Honoring 1997 Ballpark Rededication as Russell E. Diethrick, Jr. Park , Jamestown, New York

Plaque Honoring 1997 Ballpark Rededication as Russell E. Diethrick, Jr. Park , Jamestown, New York

As with every professional ballpark that reaches a certain advanced age, there is an abundance of historic plaques and markers at Diethrick Park.

Plaques Honoring History of Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

Plaques Honoring History of Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

The ballpark was home to the PONY League Jamestown Falcons from 1941 to 1956. In 1957 the league’s name was changed to the New York-Penn League. The Falcons continued play in the New York-Penn League, but only for half a season when the team ceased operation. Professional baseball returned to Jamestown Municipal Stadium in 1961 with the arrival of the New York-Penn League Jamestown Tigers, who departed after the 1965 season. The ballpark continued its affiliation with the New York-Penn League with the Jamestown Dodgers in 1966, the Jamestown Braves in 1967, the Jamestown Falcons from 1968 to 1972, the Jamestown Expos in 1973, and from 1977 to 1993, and the Jamestown Jammers from 1994 to 2014.

Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

View from the First Base Bleachers, Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

Since 1941, the team has affiliated with the following major league organizations: the Detroit Tigers from 1941 to 1942, from 1944 to 1956, from 1961 to 1965, and from 1994 to 1998, the St. Louis Cardinals in 1943, the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1957 and from 2013 to 2014, the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1966, the Atlanta Braves in 1967 and from 199 to 2001, the Boston Red Sox from 1968 to 1970, the Montreal Expos from 1971 to 1973, and from 1977 to 1993, and the Florida Marlins from 2002 to 2012.

View From Behind Home Plate, Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

View From Behind Home Plate, Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

Although Diethrick Park has undergone several renovations during its 75 years in existence, the ballpark maintains much of its classic ballpark charm.

Grandstand, Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

Grandstand, Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

The all-brick exterior hearkens back to an earlier era.

Grandstand Exterior - Behind Home Plate, Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

Grandstand Exterior – Behind Home Plate, Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

Grandstand Exterior, First Base Side, Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

Grandstand Exterior, First Base Side, Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

The bullpens are located along the first and third base lines, with the visiting team located just past the first base bleachers and the home team just past the third base bleachers.

Visitor's Bullpen, Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

Visitor’s Bullpen, Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

Home Team Bullpen, Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

Home Team Bullpen, Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

The light stanchions are original to the ballpark, installed when Diethrick Park opened in 1941.

Right Field at Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

Right Field at Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

Light Stanchion, Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

Light Stanchion, Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

The electronic scoreboard is old-school as well. Who needs a Jumbo Tron at a minor league game?

Scoreboard, Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

Scoreboard, Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

In 2014, Diethrick Park was the second oldest ballpark in the New York-Penn League. Despite of, and because of, its age, it is a wonderful place to watch a baseball game.

Night Game, Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

Night Game, Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

The people of Jamestown, New York, are proud of their association with the game of baseball. Organized baseball has been played in Jamestown since the Civil War.

Plaque Honoring the History of Professional Baseball in Jamestown, New York

Plaque Honoring the History of Professional Baseball in Jamestown, New York

The responsible for helping run Jamestown baseball at Diethrick Park are friendly and ready to assist.

Get Your Program, Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

Get Your Program, Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

A Wonderful Place to Buy Beer Under the Grandstand, Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

A Great Place to Buy Beer Under the Grandstand, Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

Jamestown Jammers Team Store, Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

Jamestown Jammers Team Store, Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

For additional history and information about Diethrick Park, see the excellent Star News Daily Article Celebrating Dietrick Park’s 70th Anniversary Season.

Night Game, Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

Night Game, Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

In 2014, the Jamestown Jamers played their last season of baseball at Diethrick Park. The franchise relocated in 2015 to Morgantown, West Virginia, where they will play as the Black Bears in a new facility shared with the University of West Virginia.

Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York,

Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

Although professional baseball may have left Jamestown, starting in 2015 Diethrick Park will be the home of the Prospect League (college wooden bat league) Jamestown Jamers, who will retain the name of the former professional team.

Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

Diethrick Park, Jamestown, New York

Luckily for the City of Jamestown, Diethrick Park will not anytime soon be joining the ranks of another lost ballpark. If you are a fan of old-time baseball stadiums, and find yourself in the Jamestown area during the spring college season or the summer wooden bat season, be sure to take in a game at old Jamestown Municipal Stadium. The citizens of Jamestown will be glad to welcome you to their gem of a ballpark.

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