Posts Tagged ‘Sanborn Map’

Bugle Field – Home of the Baltimore Elite Giants

October 6th, 2013

Bugle Field was located in East Baltimore at the intersection of Federal Street and Edison Highway, just a few blocks south of Baltimore Cemetery and approximately one and a half miles off I-895.

1601 Edison Highway, Baltimore, Maryland, Former Site of Bugle Field

In 1912, Edward C. Lastner of the Simpson and Doeller Company (a company that printed can labels), with seed money provided by his employer, leased a cow pasture from Mrs. Carrie Snyder at what is now Edison Highway and Federal Street and constructed the ballpark. From 1912 to 1917, the ballpark, known as “Label Men’s Oval,” was home to a semi pro club known as the Label Men.

Label Men at Label Men's Oval, Edward C. Lastner in Inset and Wearing Straw hat (Sun Papers)

The Label Men at Label Men’s Oval Circa 1913, Edward C. Lastner in Inset and Wearing Straw hat (Sun Papers)

About 1924, the ballpark was purchased by Joe Cambria, a scout for the Washington Senators. Cambria christened his ballpark Bugle Field, after the Bugle Coat and Apron Supply Company, a company he owned. In addition to football, boxing, and wrestling matches, Cambria brought baseball teams he owned to Bugle Field, including the Bugle Coat and Apron Nine,  at first a member of the Baltimore Amateur League and later a semipro team, and  the Hagerstown Hubs (exhibition games), a minor league team that played in the Class D Blue Ridge League (see Brian McKenna’s SABR Biography of Cambria for additional information).

According to newspaper accounts of the Baltimore Sun and the Baltimore Afro-American, the Black Sox first began playing games at Bugle Field in 1930. On September 2, 1930, the first night game was played at Bugle Field, a contest between the Black Sox and the Bugles. In 1932, Cambria purchased an interest in the Black Sox and became their general manager. Cambria made Bugle Field the Black Sox’s home field starting in 1932 (that year the Black Sox were members of the East-West League). Previously, the Black Sox had played their home games at Westport Park and Maryland Baseball Park.The Black Sox played at Bugle Field in 1933 as well, as members of the Negro National League. By 1934, the Black Sox were playing under new ownership and the team disbanded later that same year.

In 1938 a new negro league team arrived in Baltimore, making Bugle Field their home park. The Baltimore Elite Giants (pronounced EE-lite) originated in 1918 in Nashville, Tennessee. They played their home games in Nashville through the 1935 season. The Elite Giants then moved to Columbus, Ohio, in 1937, and Washington, D.C. , in 1937.

Baltimore Elite Giants Circa 1949 (Paul Henderson Photographer, courtesy of Maryland Historical Society and hendersonphotos.wordpress.com)

According to hendersonphotos.wordpress.com, the Elite Giant players in the above picture are:

Top row, left: Joe Black; Leroy Ferrell; Charles (Specs) Davidson; Lenny Pearson; Al Wilmore; Bob Romby; Johnny Hayes; Jim Gilliam; Jesse (Hoss) Walker;

Bottom row: Butch Davis; Silvester Rodgers; Henry Kimbro; Vic Harris; Henry Bayliss; Henry (Frazier) Robinson; Frank Russell; Tom (Pee Wee) Butts; Leon Day.

Baltimore Elite Giants Standing in Front of Bugle Field Scoreboard (Paul Henderson Photographer, courtesy of Maryland Historical Society and hendersonphotos.wordpress.com)

The Elite Giants played in the Negro National League from the time of their arrival in Baltimore in 1938, through the 1948 season. In 1949 the played in the Negro American League. The team brought Baltimore two league titles, the Negro National League championship in 1939, and the Negro American League championship in 1949.

Baltimore Elite Giants (Paul Henderson Photographer, courtesy of Maryland Historical Society and hendersonphotos.wordpress.com)

Elite Giant players of note include Hall of Famers Roy Campanella and Leon Day, Joe Black (1952 NL ROY), Junior Gilliam (1953 NL ROY), Lester Locket, and Bill Wright.

Hall of Famer Leon Day

The first two games of the 1949 Negro American League Championships were played at Bugle Field. After the Elite Giants went on the road to play the remaining games, the owners of the property began demolition of the ballpark in preparation for sale of the land. From newspaper accounts, it appears that the last sporting events held in Bugle Field were a exhibition by Daredevil Don Robey (automobile demolition) on September 30, 1949, and a Baltimore Soccer Club match on December 28, 1949.

Demolition of Bugle Field Commencing in Late September, early October 1949. The Third Base Grandstand Ran Parallel to Edison Highway

Demolition of Bugle Field Commencing in Late September, early October 1949. The Third Base Grandstand Ran Parallel to Edison Highway

A classified ad that ran in the Baltimore Sun on September 30 and October 1, 1949, announced the quick demise of Bugle Field:

“WRECKING BALL PARK – Used 2×4 to 8×8, 10, 60 foot Creosoted poles,

plus other lumber. Apply Bugle Field. See Mr. Reinhold PE 0371″

As shown in the Sanborn Map below, Bugle Field’s grandstand sat near the intersection of Federal Street and Edison Highway.

1936 Sandborn Map Showing Location of Bugle Field

The 1937 aerial view (thanks to Bernard McKenna) shows Bugle Field and its irregularly shaped outfield fence.

Maryland Port Administration Aerial View of Bugle Field Circa 1937 (Thanks to Bernard McKenna) (Map Located at jscholarship.library.jhu.edu)

The southwest corner of the Rockland Industries Building near the intersection of Federal Street and Edison Highway sits in the footprint of the original grandstand.

Rockland Industries Building, Former Site of Bugle Field Grandstand

The asphalt parking lot in front of Rockland Industries was once the gravel parking lot for Bugle Field.

Rockland Industries, Former Site of Bugle Field

The first base line to the right field corner ran parallel to Edison Highway.

Former Site of Bugle Field, First Base Side and Right Field Corner

Some references to Bugle Field identify its location as being the Intersection of Edison Highway and Biddle Street. However, Biddle Street, which runs parallel to Federal Street, sits four blocks south of the ballpark site. Beyond what was once right and center field is a line of trees that most likely mark the outer limits of the ballpark site.

Former Site of Bugle Field Looking from Former Right Field Corner Toward Center Field

The Sports Legends Museum, located next to Orioles Park at Camden Yards, includes a tribute to the Elite Giants, including a mock up of a bus similar to the type that Negro League players once road.

Sports Legends Museum Negro Leagues Display

In 1950, the Elite Giants moved their home games to Westport Stadium, which was located on Annapolis Road between the Baltimore-Washington Parkway and Patapsco Avenue. This should not be confused with Westport Park, which was located on Russell Street, and is where the Baltimore Black Sox played their home games from 1917 to 1920.

Bugle Field has been gone for more than half a century. No portion of the old ballpark remains at the site, nor does it appear that there are any buildings surrounding the site that date back to the days of Bugle Field. Even without any tangible ties to the old ballpark, its former site certainly is deserving of at least a Maryland historical marker noting the significance the area once had to Baltimore history and the history of baseball in the United States.

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Posted in Bugle Field, Maryland ballparks | Comments (3)

Searching For The Baltimore Black Sox’s Lost Ballparks

August 4th, 2013

Just south of Camden Yards are two historic baseball sites, the exact location of which was unknown until November 2013.  The first was Maryland Baseball Park, located at the intersection of Bush Street and Russell Street, where the Baltimore Black Sox played from 1921 to 1932. The second was Westport Park, located two blocks south of Maryland Baseball Park at the intersection of Clare Street and Annapolis Road. Westport Park is where the Baltimore Black Sox played their home games from 1917-1920. (Note: there was a second Negro League ballpark in Baltimore known as Westport Stadium, located two miles south on Annapolis Road between the Baltimore-Washington Parkway and Patapsco Avenue, where the Baltimore Elite Giants played in 1950).

The 1913 Baltimore Black Sox

The Baltimore Black Sox began about 1913 as an independent team and in 1923 joined the Eastern Colored League. In 1929 they were associated with the American Negro League and from 1930-1931 they were once again an independent team.

Baltimore Black Sox 1924 (Photo Sports Legends Museum)

Bernard McKenna, a Baltimore baseball fan and ballpark historian, discovered an aerial photograph taken by the Maryland Port Administration (and digitized by Johns Hopkins University) showing the exact location of the Maryland Baseball Park. Up until Mr. McKenna’s discovery in November 2013, the exact location of Maryland Baseball Park was unknown, as there were no known photographs of the actual ballpark.

Maryland Port Administration Aerial View of Maryland Park Circa 1927, Only Known Photograph of Ballpark (Thanks to Bernard McKenna) (Map Located at jscholarship.library.jhu.edu)

Maryland Baseball Park was located at the intersection of Bush and Russell Street on what is now 1801 Annapolis Road.

Intersection of Russell and Bush Streets Looking Southeast Toward Former Site of Maryland Park

Wheelabrator, a sold waste incinerator facility, now occupies the former site of Maryland Baseball Park.

1801 Annapolis Road, Former Site of Maryland Baseball Park, Home of the Baltimore Black Sox

The site is bounded to the northeast by Gwynn Falls Stream, which can be seen in the picture below as well as the 1927 aerial photograph of Maryland Baseball Park.

Looking East From Russell Street Down Gwynn Falls Stream Which Ran Parallel to Maryland Baseball Park's Left Field Foul Line

Maryland Baseball Park’s former left field foul line ran parallel to Gwynn Falls Stream.

Location of Maryland Baseball Park's Former Left Field Foul Line

Maryland Baseball Park’s former right field foul line ran parallel to Annapolis Road.

Looking South Down Annapolis Road Which Parallel's Maryland Baseball Park's Former Right Field Foul Line

Maryland Baseball Park’s former grandstand and infield once sat in the spot now occupied by the front entrance to the Wheelabrator facility.

Wheelabrator Baltimore Southwest Resource Recovery Facility, Former Site of Maryland Baseball Park

The distinctive smoke stack, with the words “Baltimore” and “RESCO” painted on its sides, dominates the site, providing an easy landmark for anyone trying to find the former site of Maryland Baseball Park.

Looking North on Annapolis Road From Westport Toward Former Site of Maryland Baseball Park

On the southwest corner of Russell and Bush Street is an Exxon gas station at 1800 Russell Street, which is located across the street from the former site of Maryland Park.

Southwest Corner Of Bush And Russell Streets, Former Site of Maryland Baseball Park

Behind the Exxon at 1701 Ridgely Street is a warehouse, which, according to city land records, was constructed n 1925. The building is the current home of DSI,LLC, a company that sells mechanical equipment. That building can be seen in the 1927 aerial photograph of Maryland Baseball Park.

1701 Ridgely Street

Several other buildings that date to the time of Maryland Baseball Park remain across Russell Street, catty-corner from the ballpark site. At 1925 Bush Street is the F.L. Anderson Company, built in 1914. According to Charles Underwood, Vice President of F.L. Anderson, land in that area was constructed on top of infill material from the great Baltimore fire of 1904. The building at 1645 Ridgely Street, located just northwest of F.L. Anderson, likewise dates to the early 1900s.

Intersection of Bush and Russell Streets, Just South Of Oriole Park at Camden Yards

The land on which Maryland Baseball Park was constructed was owned by the B&O Railroad. Newspaper advertisements of the day tout the ballpark’s easy access on the “Ridgeley Car Line.” Ridgeley Street is located northwest of the former ballpark site and can be seen in the 1927 photograph of Maryland Baseball Park.

The Black Sox were the ballpark’s major tenant. However, other sporting events, such as boxing and soccer, were played at the park. Notable games played at Maryland Baseball Park include games three and four of the 1924 Negro League World Series between the Hilldales and the Kansas City Monarchs.

1929 Baltimore Black Sox (Photo Sports Legends Museum)

As to the location of the Black Sox’s earlier ballpark, evidence uncovered by Mr. McKenna likewise suggests that Westport Park was located two blocks south of Maryland Baseball Park at the intersection of Clare Street and Annapolis Road.

Maryland Port Administration Aerial View of Maryland Park and Westport Park, Circa 1927 (Map Located at jscholarship.library.jhu.edu)

Previously, it had been thought that Westport Park was located north of the intersection of Russell and Bush Streets. According to James Bready’s book  “Baseball in Baltimore,” Westport Park was located at 1701 Russell Street. A Holiday Inn Express now sits at that site. At the northeast corner of Bush and Russell Streets today is a BP Gas Station which sits directly south of the Holiday Inn. In actuality, Westport Park was located south of Maryland Baseball Park.

1701 Russell Street - Holiday Inn Express

Because there was no known picture of Westport Park, it was difficult to determine precisely where the ballpark actually sat. The same aerial photograph taken by the Maryland Port Administration, which shows the location of Maryland Baseball Park, also shows what remained at that time of Westport Park.

Maryland Port Administration Aerial View of Westport Park Circa 1927 (Thanks to Bernard McKenna) (Map Located at jscholarship.library.jhu.edu)

Home plate was near the northeast corner Claire Street and Annapolis Road.

Former Site of Westport Park, Northeast Corner of Claire Street and Annapolis Road, Baltimore, Maryland

Up until recently, the portion of the site that was once the first base side of the ballpark was occupied by the Westport Electrical Substation.

Westport Substation, Claire Road, Former Site of Westport Park's Right Field

The land is owned by the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company and it is uncertain whether anything is planned for the site. Perhaps a neighborhood ballfield?

Westport Substation Sign

The shopping center at 1915 – 1921 Annapolis Road sits on what was once Westport Park’s left field corner.

Shopping Center at 1915-1921 Annapolis Road, former Site of Westport Park's Left Field

Houses that date to to the time of Westport Park are located just south of the site on Annapolis Road. The house at 2009 Annapolis Road was built in 1920, while the houses at 2011 and 2013 were built in 1900.

Row Houses located at 2009, 2011, 2013 Annapolis Road, Baltimore, Maryland

In 1932 the Black Sox joined the East West League and played their games at Bugle Field, home of the Baltimore Elite Giants. Bugle Field was located at the intersection of Federal Street and Edison Highway. In 1933-1934 the Black Sox were members of the Negro National League. Future Hall of Famer Leon Day, a Baltimore native, began his professional career with the 1934 Black Sox. According to Robert Leffler’s thesis “The History of Black Baseball in Baltimore 1913 to 1951,” Maryland Baseball Park became a junk yard in 1934.

Hall of Famer Leon Day

The Elites left Bugle Field after the 1949 season and played their home games at Westport Stadium in 1950 (not to be confused with Westport Park). Once located on Old Annapolis Road between Route 295 (Baltimore-Washington Parkway) and Patapsco Avenue, Westport Stadum subsequently was used as a NASCAR-sanctioned racetrack.

The Sports Legends Museum, located next to Orioles Park at Camden Yards a mile northeast of the old site of Maryland Baseball Park, includes a tribute to the Black Sox.

Sports Legends Museum Display About Baltimore Black Sox

A bus similar to the type that Negro League players once road is included in the Sports Legends Museum display.

Sports Legends Museum Negro Leagues Display

Westport Park and Maryland Baseball Park are both truly lost ballparks. Now, thanks to Mr. McKenna, we have photographs and know the exact location of each park. Both sites are worth a visit the next time you find yourself heading to or from an Orioles game at Camden Yards.

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Posted in Maryland ballparks, Westport Park/Maryland Baseball Park | Comments (3)

Baltimore’s First American League Park – Original Home of the Future New York Yankees

August 23rd, 2012

The southwest corner of East 29th Street and Greenmount Avenue in Baltimore, Maryland, is the site of two former major league baseball fields.

Intersection of Greenmount Avenue and East 29th Street, Baltimore, Maryland

From 1890-1891, the site held Oriole Park (II) (the second Oriole Park according to Phillip Lowry and his excellent book Green Cathedrals) and was home to the American Association Baltimore Orioles.

Southwest Corner of East 29th Street and Barclay Street in Baltimore, Former Site of Two Former Major League Ballparks

A second ballpark – American League Park – was constructed on that site (also known as Oriole Park IV) (the fourth, according to Mr. Lowry) and was home to the American League Baltimore Orioles for the 1901 and 1902 seasons.

American League Park (Photo - Babe Ruth Museum) Entrance on Greenmount Avenue (Near 29th Street)

American League Park should not be confused with Terrapin Park, which was located across 29th Street from American League Park at the northwest corner of East 29th Street and Greenmount. Terrapin Park was home to the Federal League Baltimore Terrapins in 1914 and 1915, the International League Orioles from 1916 to 1944, and the Negro American League Baltimore Elite Giants from 1938 to 1944 (see Terrapin Park/Oriole Park). The 1914 map below (with thanks to Bernard McKenna) shows the locations of both parks.

Atlas of the City of Baltimore, Maryland Topographical Survey Commission 1914 (mdhistory.net)

In 1903, Baltimore’s American League franchise was sold to New York interests and became the New York Highlanders, and later the New York Yankees. The Eastern League Baltimore Orioles (the league was renamed the International League in 1911) took over American League Park for the 1903 season.

Opening Day April 26, 1909, at Oriole Park (Library of Congress Division of Prints and Photographs, Washington, D.C.)

The ballpark was also where Babe Ruth, playing for the International League Orioles in 1914, played for Baltimore during his one year of professional minor league baseball.

A Sanborn Insurance Map shows the location of much of the ballpark in 1901.

1901 Sanborn Insurance Map of Baltimore Showing Location of American League Park

A McDonald’s now stands at the site, its restaurant and drive through covering the left field corner and the parking lot behind it covering much of the infield.

Former Site of American League Park, Baltimore - Note the building on the corner is the same building in the above vintage picture of American League Park

Home plate was once located in the southeast corner of East 29th Street and Barclay. No, that is not a young Babe Ruth standing in the approximate location of home plate, it is actually SABR Bob Davids Chapter President Bruce Brown.

Former Site of American League Park's Home Plate

The first-base line ran parallel to Barclay.

American League Park's First Base Line Ran Parallel to Barclay Street (Seen Here Looking South)

The third-base line ran parallel to East 29th Street.

Former Site of American League Park Baltimore, Looking Across Left Field Toward Home Plate/First Base

Two-story row houses fronting both sides of Llchester Road, constructed after the demise of American League Park, cover the remaining portion of the ballpark site.

Back Side Of Houses Facing Llchester Road Located In Former Center Field

The perimeter of the park ran from East 29th Street to the north, to Greenmount Avenue to the east, to East 28th Street to the South and to Barclay Street to the west.

Greenmount Avenue Looking South From Former Left Field Corner Toward Center Field

Six blocks south of the former ballpark site is St. Ann’s Catholic Church (at the corner of Greenmount Avenue and East 22nd Street) which is where former Orioles John McGraw married his second wife, the former Blanche Sindall. The church’s Gothic spiral is visible down Greenmount.

The Steeple Of St. Ann's Church Visible Down Greenmount Avenue (just beyond red traffic light)

The areas surrounding the Harwood section of Baltimore includes several former ballpark sites. To the northwest is the former site of Memorial Stadium, home of the American League Baltimore Orioles from 1954 to 1991. It is located less than a mile from old American League Park – four blocks north on Greenmount and five blocks east on 33rd Street. Four blocks to the south is the former site of Union Park (East 25th and Barclay), home of the National League Baltimore Orioles of the 1890s (see Union Park). If you consider yourself a true fan of Baltimore baseball, be sure to make the effort and visit these former sites. You can even stop for a hamburger and fries and consume them while siting in a booth located in American League Park’s former left field.

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Posted in American League Park/Oriole Park IV, Maryland ballparks | Comments (12)

Union Park – Home of the World Champion National League Baltimore Orioles

February 19th, 2012

Union Park lasted as a major league venue for a mere nine seasons, from 1891 to 1899.  Known also as Oriole Park (III) and the Baltimore Baseball and Exhibition Grounds, the ballpark was home of the World Champion (1894-1896) National League Baltimore Orioles. Union Park was located at the corner of East 25th Street and and what is now Hunter Street in the Barclay section of Baltimore, just south of Harwood.

Union Park, Baltimore, Home of the National League Orioles, circa 1897 (Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division)

In the picture above, the houses immediately to the right of the grandstand are located on East 25th Street.  The houses on the right side of the picture, looming behind left center field, are located on Barclay Street.

Location of Union Park's Former Grandstand, Baltimore

Many of those houses remain at the site today, providing a point of reference for the ball field.

Back Side of 321 East 25th Street, Former Site of Union Park, Baltimore

The back side of the building located at 321 East 25th Street, which currently houses the St. Ambrose Housing Aid Center, with its distinctive pitched roof, can seen in the 1897 photograph, immediately to the right of the grandstand.

Houses on East Side of Barclay Street, Baltimore

The houses on the east side of Barclay Street are visible in the 1897 photograph of Union Park, just behind the bleachers in left field.

Corner of East 24th Street and Barclay, Baltimore

In the above photograph – the corner of East 25th Street and Barclay –  the house to the left was built on what would have once been Union Park’s center field.

Former Site of Union Park Left and Center Field Bleachers, Baltimore

The houses on the west side of Barclay Street, looking toward East 25th Street, pictured above, sit in place of Union Park’s left and center field bleachers.

Former Right Field Corner of Union Park, Baltimore

Union Park’s right field was located at the corner of East 24th Street and Guilford Avenue, which is seen in the above photograph, looking on East 24th Street toward Guilford.  The brick buildings to the right of the picture along East 24th Street were constructed after the demolition of Union Park. Indeed, the buildings that line East 24th Street today sit in the southern most point of Union Park’s outfield.

A Sanford Insurance Map from 1901 shows the exact location of Union Park.

1901 Sanborn Insurance Map of Baltimore Showing Location of Union Park

According to the Sanborn map it appears that Guilford Avenue originally dead ended at 24th Street and that a portion of the first base grand stand actually sat in the middle of what is now Guilford Avenue.

Union Park, East 25th Street, Baltimore, circa 1895 (photo courtesy of the Maryland Historical Society)

The above photograph shows the entrance to Union Park on East 25th Street.  The brick building in the background, beyond the wooden ballpark, remains today at the site.  It is the same building mentioned above that was located just to the right of the Union Park grandstand, and sits at 321 East 25th Street.

Former Location of Entrance to Union Park, Baltimore

The red brick building at 321 East 25th Street is visible in the background of the above photograph.   To the right of that building is Falls Alley, which allows entrance into the former playing field from East 25th Street.

Building to the Right of Falls Alley, Gateway to Union Park's Former Playing Field

The row houses contructed on the site of Union Park’s former grandstand date to the early 1920s.

Former Site of Union Park Grandstand

Still remaining at the former site of Union Park is a short red brick wall with an iron gate entrance that once stood next to the Union Park grandstand.  Behind that gate was once a soda stand. That soda stand can be seen above in the 1895 photograph of Union Park, next to 321 East 25th Street.

Iron Gate Remaining from Time of Union Park, Baltimore

It is estimated that home plate sat behind the row house that currently sits at 303 East 25th Street.

Former Location of Home Plate, Union Park, Baltimore

The area that was once the infield is now a parking lot and a collection of brick garages –  an unceremonious use of such hallowed ground.

Former Location of First Base Grandstand, Union Park, Baltimore

Just to the right of the house at 321 East 25th Street, along the left field foul line, was a large, two-story billboard for “A.G. Spalding & Bros.” The billboard advertised Spalding bicycles and athletic equipment.

Union Park Billboard For A. G. Spalding & Bros

Although Union Park was wiped from the landscape over 100 years ago, the neighborhood surrounding the former site offers several clues to the ballpark’s location.  It certainly is worth a trip for any fans of the Baltimore Orioles (click Union Park Demise for a Baltimore Sun article about its impending demolition).

1897 Baltimore Orioles (Huggins and Scott Auctions image)

With the demolition 10 years ago of Memorial Stadium, there currently exists no baseball venue in Baltimore where the Orioles have won a World Championship.

For more baseball history located nearby, see John McGraw and St. Ann’s Catholic Church for pictures and information about where Orioles third baseman John McGraw married his second wife, Blanche Sindall. For pictures and information about American League Park – located just four blocks north Union Park and where McGraw played and managed the 1901-02 American League Baltimore Orioles, see The Orioles First American League Park. To see where McGraw and three of his Hall of Fame teammates are buried just a few miles west, see New Cathedral Cemetery, Final Resting Place of Four Oriole HOFs.

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Posted in Maryland ballparks, Union Park/Oriole Park III | Comments (12)