Posts Tagged ‘Appalachian League’

Knoxville’s Lost Ballparks – Caswell Field, Smithson Stadium, Bill Meyer Stadium

May 6th, 2015

Since at least 1917, baseball has been played at a ball field located at 633 Jessamine Street near the intersection of East 5th Street and Jessamine Street in Knoxville Tennessee. In 1916, William Caswell, a former confederate soldier, donated land to the city in East Knoxville for construction of a public park, including a ball field, which became known as Caswell Park. Caswell was one of the original longtime fans of the game, having participated in what may have been the first game of baseball played in Tennessee – an 1865 contest between the Holstons, Caswell’s team, composed of former Confederate soldiers, and the Knoxvilles, composed of former Union soldiers.

Home Plate, Formerly Bill Meyer Stadium, Knoxville, Tennessee

Ball Field at 633 Jessamine Street, Formerly Caswell Field, Smithson Stadium, and Bill Meyer Stadium, Knoxville, Tennessee

Professional baseball was first played at 633 Jessamine Street in 1921, when the Appalachian League Knoxville Pioneers called Caswell Field home. In 1925, Knoxville changed leagues and names, joining the South Atlantic League as the Knoxville Smokies, in honor of the nearby Great Smoky Mountains. Knoxville did not field a team in 1930, and shared a Southern Association team with Mobile in 1931 (playing their games in Mobile, Alabama).

Former Site of Caswell Field, Smithson Field, and Bill Meyer Stadium, Knoxville, Tennessee

Former Site of Caswell Field, Smithson Stadium, and Bill Meyer Stadium, Knoxville, Tennessee

In 1932, Caswell Field was replaced with a new ballpark, Smithson Stadium, named in honor of the Knoxville City Councilman W.N. Smithson who spearheaded a drive to bring professional baseball back to the city.  The Southern Association Knoxville Smokies returned that same year, playing their home games at Smithson Park. In 1946, the Smokies joined the Tri State League and in 1953 played in the Mountain States League.

Memorial Garden, Former Site of Bill Meyer Stadium, Knoxville, Tennessee

Memorial Garden, Former Site of Bill Meyer Stadium, Knoxville, Tennessee

In 1953 Smithson Stadium was demolished by a fire and the city constructed a new ballpark, Municipal Stadium, on the site. In 1954 the Smokies rejoined the Tri-State League for one season, playing at new Municipal Stadium. Knoxville did not have a professional team in 1955, but half way through the 1956 season the South Atlantic League Montgomery Rebels moved to Knoxville.

Bill Meyer Stadium Postcard

Bill Meyer Stadium Postcard

In 1957, Municipal Stadium was renamed Bill Meyer Stadium in honor of Knoxville native and former major league player and manager William Adam Meyer. In 1964, the Smokies joined the Southern League, where they have played ever since. In 1972 the team changed its name to the Knoxville Sox and in 1980, the Knoxville Blue Jays. In 1993, the team changed its name back to the Knoxville Smokies.

Plaque Honoring Bill Meyer Stadium, Knoxville, Tennessee

Plaque Honoring Bill Meyer Stadium, Knoxville, Tennessee

Professional baseball departed Bill Meyer Stadium after the 1999 season. In 2003 the stadium was demolished and in 2008 the ball field was renamed “Ridley-Helton Ballfield.” Neal Ridley was a former owner of the Knoxville Smokies and was largely responsible for keeping minor league baseball in Knoxville in the 1950s. Todd Helton is a Knoxville native and former Major League player who provided funds to renovate the ball field.

Plaque Honoring RIdley/Helton Ballfield at Bill Meyer Stadium, Knoxville, Tennessee

Plaque Honoring Neal Ridley and Todd Helton at Former Site of Bill Meyer Stadium, Knoxville, Tennessee

Although the Bill Meyer Stadium structure is long gone, the field remains, as well as modest bleachers and covered dugouts.

Fence Surrounding Infield, Bill Meyer Stadium, Knoxville, Tennessee

First Base Foul Line and Dugout, Ridley-Helton Field, Knoxville, Tennessee

The stadium grandstand behind home plate once sat in what is now an extension of Jessamine Street, which runs behind home plate and a memorial park.

Former Location of Third Base Grandstand, Bill Meyer Stadium, Knoxville, Tennessee

Former Location of Third Base Grandstand, Bill Meyer Stadium, Now Ridley-Helton Field, Knoxville, Tennessee

A metal storage shed remains on the site from the time of Bill Meyer Stadium, still painted Knoxville Smokies blue.

Storage Shed Remaining At Site Next to Former Terminus of Third Base Grandstand

Storage Shed Remaining At Site Next to Former Terminus of Third Base Grandstand

Out beyond left field is the former Standard Knitting Mills Building. The building has loomed large over the outfield wall since its construction in the mid 1940’s.

Standard Knitting Mills Building Out Beyond Left Field, Bill Meyer Stadium, Knoxville, Tennessee

Standard Knitting Mills Building Out Beyond Left Field at Ridley-Helton Field, Formerly Bill Meyer Stadium, Knoxville, Tennessee

Detail of Standard Knitting Mills Building, Bill Meyer Stadium, Knoxville, Tennessee

Detail of Standard Knitting Mills Building, Knoxville, Tennessee

Several light stanchions original to Bill Meyer Stadium remain at the site as well.

Light Stanchion, Memorial Garden, Bill Meyer Stadium, Knoxville, Tennessee

Light Stanchion, Ridley-Helton Field, Formerly Bill Meyer Stadium, Knoxville, Tennessee

Today Ridley-Helton Field continues to host youth and high school baseball, helping insure that baseball will continue to be played into the field’s second century.

RIght Field Line, Bill Meyer Stadium, Knoxville, Tennessee

Right Field Line, Ridley-Helton Field, Formerly Bill Meyer Stadium, Knoxville, Tennessee

In 2000, the Knoxville Smokies moved 20 miles east to a new ballpark, Smokies Park, located in Kodak, Tennessee. Having departed Knoxville, the team changed its name to the Tennessee Smokies.

Smokies Stadium, Kodak, Tennessee, Home of the Tennessee Smokies

Smokies Stadium, Kodak, Tennessee, Home of the Tennessee Smokies

Smokies Park also serves as a visitor center for the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Smokies Park and Smoky Mountain Visitors Center, Kodak, Tennessee

Smokies Park and Smoky Mountain Visitors Center, Kodak, Tennessee

Out beyond right field are four wood stadium seats from Bill Meyer Stadium, painted Knoxville Smokies blue.

Seats from Bill Meyer Stadium, Located Beyond Left Field Wall, Smokies Stadium, Kodak, Tennessee

Seats from Bill Meyer Stadium, Located Beyond Left Field Wall, Smokies Stadium, Kodak, Tennessee

Smokies Park is a fine minor league facility and a great place to watch a game of baseball. However, it has another 85 years before it can match the nearly 100 years of baseball that has been played at the Smokies former home in Knoxville.

Chicago Cubs Prospect Kris Bryant at Smokies Stadium, Kodak, Tennessee

Chicago Cubs Prospect Kris Bryant at Smokies Stadium, Kodak, Tennessee

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Bill Meyer Stadium/Ridely-Helton Field, Tennessee ballparks | Comments (0)

Salem Municipal Stadium/Kiwanis Field – Still A Fine Old Ballpark

April 22nd, 2015

Salem Kiwanis Field is located at 731 Indiana Street in Salem, Virginia. Opened in 1932, the ballpark was constructed by the City of Salem for use as a local town and high school baseball and football field. Originally known as Salem Municipal Stadium, the ballpark’s name was changed to Salem Kiwanis Field at some point subsequent to 1995.

Salem Municipal Stadium, Kiwanis Field, Salem, Virginia

Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

From 1939 to 1942, the Virginia League Salem-Roanoke Friends played their home games at Salem Municipal Stadium. In 1943, the team moved to Maher Field in Roanoke. Professional baseball returned briefly to Salem in 1946, when the Blue Ridge League Salem Friends played at Salem Municipal Stadium for part of that season.

Exterior of Outfield Wall, Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

Exterior of Outfield Wall, Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

In 1955, the unaffiliated Appalachian League Salem Rebels began playing at Salem Municipal Stadium. The team included future Hall of Famer Orlando Cepeda, who signed with the New York Giants as an amateur free agent that same year. Salem’s professional team affiliated with several different Major League franchises over the years, beginning with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1957. The Pirates organization departed after the 1959 season, but returned from 1964 to 1980, and from 1987 to 1994. From 1960 to 1963 Salem was an affiliate of the San Francisco Giants. From 1981 to 1983, Salem was affiliate of the San Diego Padres, and from 1984 to 1986, Salem was an affiliate of the Texas Rangers.

Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

The Rebels joined the Carolina League in 1968. In 1972, the team changed its name to the Salem Pirates. From 1981 to 1986, the team was known as the Salem Redbirds. From 1987 to 1994, the team was known as the Salem Buccaneers. In 1995, the team switched affiliations to the Colorado Rockies and became the Salem Avalanche.

Scoreboard, Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

Scoreboard, Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

On August 22, 1974, a tragic accident occurred at Salem Municipal Stadium when 17 year old right fielder Alfredo Edmead died after colliding with second baseman Pablo Cruz. A plaque in memory of Emead was placed at the ballpark but subsequently was moved to the Salem-Roanoke Baseball Hall of Fame.

View of Field and First Base Dugout From First Base Bleachers, Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

View From First Base Bleachers, Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

Situated in the Roanoke Valley between the Allegheny and Blue Ridge Mountains, the ballpark offers commanding views of the surrounding mountain.

Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

Salem Kiwanis Field is an earthen ballpark, with grandstand and concrete bleacher seating set into the side of a hill that runs along the back of the ballpark.

Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

As such, there is no traditional stadium structure located behind the ballpark seating bowl.

Grandstand Roof, Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

Grandstand Roof, Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

Grandstand Roof, Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

Grandstand Roof, Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

A later addition to the ballpark was the construction of a press box behind the back of the home plate grandstand.

Press Box, Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

Press Box, Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

The covered grandstand includes wooden seats dating back to at least the 1950s.

Wood Seats, Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

Wood Seats, Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

Wood Seats, Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

Wood Seats, Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

Concrete bleachers are located on either side of the covered grandstand. Because the ballpark was designed and used for both baseball and football, the concrete bleachers do not curve around the infield as they would in a baseball-only ballpark.

First Base Concrete Bleachers, Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

First Base Concrete Bleachers, Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

The dugouts, like the surrounding seating area, are set into the side of the hill.

View of Field and First Base Dugout From First Base Bleachers, Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

View of Field and First Base Dugout From First Base Bleachers, Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

The bullpens are located along the first and third base foul lines, out of play.

Bullpen, Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

Bullpen, Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

The concrete block concession stand located behind the first base bleachers harkens back to an earlier era when the game itself was the main attraction.

Concession Stand, Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

Concession Stand, Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

Salem Kiwanis Field currently is the home of the University of Roanoke Maroons baseball team and the Salem High School Spartans. The local American Legion team, as well as the Roanoke Rails of the Carolina-Virginia Collegiate League, play their home games at Salem Kiwanis Field.

Salem Kiwanis Field, Home of the Salem Spartans, Salem, Virginia

Salem Kiwanis Field, Home of the Salem High School Spartans, Salem, Virginia

The Salem Avalanche played a portion of the 1995 season at Salem Municipal Stadium while construction was being completed on a new ballpark located just a half mile east of Salem Municipal Stadium.

Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

Salem Kiwanis Field, Formerly Salem Municipal Stadium, Salem, Virginia

On August 7, 1995, the Avalanche played their first game at Salem Memorial Baseball Stadium, and professional baseball at the old ballpark departed, presumably forever.

Salem Memorial Baseball Stadium, Salem, Virginia

Salem Memorial Baseball Stadium, Salem, Virginia

Salem Memorial Baseball Stadium, Salem, Virginia

Salem Memorial Baseball Stadium, Salem, Virginia

Fortunately for fans of old-time ballparks, Salem Kiwanis Field remains an important part of the Salem community, hosting both college, high school, and summer collegiate baseball. Hopefully Salem’s continued use of the ballpark will help insure that it does not any time soon become just another lost ballpark.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Salem Kiwanis Field/Salem Municipal Stadium, Virginia ballparks | Comments (2)